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Baby Beluga

By Raffi and Debi Pike

Baby Beluga in the deep blue sea,
Swim so wild and you swim so free.
Heaven above, and the sea below,
And a little white whale on the go.

Baby beluga, baby Beluga, is the water warm?
Is your mama home with you, so happy.

Way down yonder where the dolphins play,
Where they dive and splash all day,
The waves roll in and the waves roll out,
See the water squirting out of your spout.

Baby beluga, baby Beluga, sing your little song,
Sing for all your friends, we like to hear you.

When it's dark, you're home and fed,
Curl up snug in your water bed.
Moon is shining and the stars are out,
Good night, little whale, goodnight.

Baby beluga, baby Beluga, with tomorrow's sun,
Another day's begun, you'll soon be waking.

Baby Beluga in the deep blue sea,
Swim so wild and you swim so free.
Heaven above and the sea below,
And a little white whale on the go.
You're just a little white whale on the go.


Learn more about how the way we treat our environment affects the world's whale populations from The True Story of Inky the Whale, a Coloring and Activity Book by the US Coast Guard created to teach children through the true story of Inky, a pygmy sperm whale, about conservation, recycling, and the problems caused by trash and marine debris.

Actions: Hands together, make the shape of a small whale jumping over the waves.


Note: Despite these wonderful lyrics, baby beluga whales are not really white. The young are slate-grey to reddish-brown which changes to blue-grey at 2 years of age. Young animals may be similar in colour to Narwhals (Monodon monoceros) but are only found in the company of Beluga adults. The adult Beluga is white, but may appear yellowish at certain times of the year. Some people believe that is the reason for the nickname "Sea Canary", but in actuality, the nickname is due to their varied and complicated whistling communication, which can often be heard right through the hull of small boats in the vicinity of a pod of Belugas. Learn more about the Beluga Whale at the WhaleNet website.