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Mrs. Landers and the 1999-2000 KMAC Kids

What Could It Be, Beverly is a true story. Beverly is now Mrs. Dennis Landers. She is all grown up with children of her own. She has been a teacher and is now the principal of Chico Christian School in Chico, California. When Mrs. Landers was 10 years old, her family was poisoned by carbon monoxide and natural gas from a leak in her family's furnace. The poisoning went undetected for 18 months. Every member of Mrs. Landers' family suffered liver damage from the poisoning. Mrs. Landers and her mom were probably most seriously affected because they spent the most time inside. Mrs. Landers has to work hard to stay well. She continues to be very sensitive to many things, especially the chemicals in cleaning products, pesticides and fragrances. We appreciate her for letting the KMAC Kids  share her story.

 

Little picture of Midnight Midnight may have also been affected by the poisoning. When Mrs. Landers' mom tried to put a flea collar on him he bit her on the arm and chest. As she fell backward the collar flew out of her hand and away from Midnight. He immediately came to lick and love her. He was soooo sorry! The next time YOU feel sad or confused or if you are dizzy or sick all the time, remember the air that you breathe can affect the way you feel and behave and live and learn.

  

Beverly's portrait (on Mrs. Landers page) Don't forget Beverly and her family and their house in the piney woods.

KMAC Kids  understand that pure water, clean air, exercise, a nutritious diet and healthy personal choices affect the way they learn and live.

Inspired by:
Hooker Oak School
1238 Arbutus Avenue
Chico, CA 95926

Visit the KMAC Kids Website! 

 

The What Could It Be, Beverly story was created by and included here with the permission of the KMAC Kids 2000. KMAC stands for: Kids Making A Connection, Health & the Environment. The NIEHS Kids' Pages website is prepared by the NIEHS Office of Management, (919) 541-0395, PO Box 12233, RTP, NC 27709, for the Office of Communications, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

KMAC stands for: Kids Making A Connection, Health & the Environment; KMAC activities were originally supported by an NIEHS grant in K-12 environmental health science education, "Toxrap" Network.

 

 

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